Top 10 Most Affordable Night Vision Monoculars

monocular title

The ability to see in the darkness is not innate in humans, as it is in many animals. We see objects because of the light they emit or reflect. In the darkness, there is little to no light to reflect or being emitted, and the pupils in the eyes cannot detect that level of light. Some animals, such as cats and owls, however, have evolved with larger pupils to enable them to see more clearly in the dark.

As with many of today’s inventions, a military need drove the development of science to enable us to see in the dark. Aircraft detection at night in the UK was causing problems during World War I, and a Hungarian scientist, Kalman Tihanyi, developed an infrared sensing camera to help solve that issue. The German military began to equip their tank fleet with night vision devices in the 1940s, following their development in the late 1930s. American snipers began using night vision rifle scopes late in World War II, and also during the Korean conflict in the 1950s (Wikipedia).

OUR PERSONAL BEST CHOICE

Just so you don’t have to keep scrolling up and down this document, let’s summarize everything in one place. Here’s a list of the “best of” night vision monoculars, based on the overall price, customer ratings and reviews, specifications and features, and the pros and cons of each of the models we reviewed:

Best Professional Model

Flir Scout III Thermal

Best Professional Model Runner-up


Pulsar Helion XP Thermal

Best Overall Model

Night Owl iGen Day/Night NVM


Best Performance Model


Bestguarder HD NVM

Best Value Model

Bestguarder HD NVM

Best Value Model Runner – Up


Boblov Digital NVM

Night division devices normally fall into one of three main categories:

  • The first is night vision cameras. These are often put into a fixed location, such as the side of a building, warehouse, or parking lot, for security purposes. The images they capture can either be recorded and reviewed later or sent to a monitor, where they can be watched real-time.

  • The second category of night vision devices is binocular goggles, having two eye pieces. Goggles can be handheld, as in the case of night vision binoculars, but can also be head- or helmet- mounted, which is often seen in the military, law enforcement, and search and rescue operations where it is important to keep the hands free.

  • The third category of devices is scopes; these are monocular devices, those having a single eye piece. They are often handheld and used in situations where you will want to look at something, then return to normal vision. Many times, you will see scopes mounted to rifles as an aid to hunters. It should be noted, however, that there are some restrictions to rifle mounted night vision scopes, so you should consult your local or state regulations before purchasing for this application.

In this article, we’ll be looking at a cross-section of monocular night vision devices. Some will be hybrids, containing both night vision and camera functionality. Some will be thermal-based technology, where the NVD will sense heat from the target, and not rely on light to “see.” Some of these thermal cameras will also have camera capability. Our cross section will cover a baker’s dozen night vision monoculars – ten in the “budget” category, and another three in the “professional” application area.

Before we jump into the main body of this article, let’s take a look at how a night vision monocular works.

Night vision goggles boost a dim, dark scene in a series of simple steps:

  • 1. Dim light from a night scene enters the objective lens at the front. The light is made of photons (particles of light) of all colors.

  • 2. As the photons enter the goggles, they strike a light-sensitive surface called a photocathode. It’s a bit like a very precise solar panel: its job is to convert photons into electrons (the tiny, subatomic particles that carry electricity around a circuit).

  • 3. The electrons are amplified by a photomultiplier, a kind of photoelectric cell. Each electron entering the photomultiplier results in many more electrons leaving it.

  • 4. The electrons leaving the photomultiplier hit a phosphor screen, similar to the screen in an old-fashioned television. As the electrons hit the phosphor, they create tiny flashes of light.

  • 5. Since there are many more photons than originally entered the goggles, the screen makes a much brighter version of the original scene.

So, regardless of whether we are talking about night vision scopes, monoculars, binoculars, cameras, or goggles, the operational aspects are exactly the same – gather and amplify whatever light is available – moonlight, starlight, etc. – and use that amplified light to enable improved night vision.

While we will talk about thermal vision here also, that technology is different than night vision. Thermal devices will capture sources of heat, and make these sources stand out from the surrounding area. Some of these models also can be used for both night and normal daylight viewing.

NVDs can be used for a wide variety of applications. We’ve already touched on law enforcement, military, and search and rescue, and they can also be used for wildlife watching, human surveillance, navigation, and detecting hidden objects, right down to where your dog is hiding in the back yard. Some of these models, because of the military technology used, are not eligible to be exported. And, as noted, various state or local regulations may ban or limit their use in specific applications. Please verify applicability with your local regulations.

As noted, we’ve put together a list of thirteen monoculars, in one configuration or another. All are available at Amazon.com, and prices and review information come from that site. Ten of these NVDs fall into a “budget” category; the other three definitely do not qualify as budget, so we’ll categorize them as professional. In this article, we’ll give you an overview of the items, starting with the table below. We’ll then look at some of the features of these monoculars that might influence your buying decisions. Then we will drop down a level, and give you a detailed appraisal of each unit, including general impressions, key features and specifications, and the pros and cons of each of them. Finally, we’ll wrap up with some recommendations on which monoculars might be right for you, for specific applications.

In the table below, we’ve sorted the night vision monoculars based on their ratings from the Amazon site. If the ratings are identical for two models, we’ve listed the more expensive item second. Finally, items with less than 25 customer reviews will be highlighted; readers are cautioned to investigate the specifications and performance of these in more detail. In those cases, a couple of five-star or one-star reviews and really skew the results. The prices shown are current, for base units only, and do not include any options or supplemental warranties.

Product Best Features Rating Price Range View on Amazon
Boblov Digital night vision monocular

Boblov Digital NVM

  • 5×32 optics
  • Day/night capability
  • 150 yard range
  • 16 GB photo or video storage

5** out of 5

$140

View on Amazon

Bestguarder HD night vision monocular
Bestguarder HD NVM

  • 6×50 optics
  • 350-yard range
  • day/night use
  • water-resistant housing

4.3 out of 5

$165

View on Amazon

Night Owl iGen Day and Night NVM
Night Owl iGen Day/Night NVM

  • proprietary image technology
  • day/night use
  • adjustable light amplification

4.2 out of 5

$399

View on Amazon

Flir Scout TK Thermal
Flir Scout TK Thermal

  • thermal imager
  • pocket-sized
  • 100-yard range
  • photo/video capability

4.1 out of 5

$499

View on Amazon

Solomark Night Vision Monocular
Solomark Night Vision Monocular

  • 110 yard range
  • 4GB photo & video image storage
  • variable infrared illumination

3.9 out of 5

$130

View on Amazon

Bushnell Equinox 260150 night vision monocular

Bushnell Equinox 260150 NVM

  • 6×50 optics
  • optional SD card up to 32GB
  • 320 yard range claimed
  • day/night operations

3.9 out of 5

$254

View on Amazon

Sightmark Ghost Hunter night vision monocularSightmark Ghost Hunter NVM

  • 2×24 optics
  • 2X magnification
  • auto-shutoff in bright light

3.8 out of 5

$165

View on Amazon

Double Sun HD night vision monocular
Double Sun HD NVM

  • day/night capability
  • 200 yard range
  • 5×40 optics
  • 8 GB storage included

3.8** out of 5

170

View on Amazon

Firefield FF24063 night vision monocular
Firefield FF24063

  • 4×50 optics
  • lightweight
  • water resistant
  • 120 yard range

3.7 out of 5

$124

View on Amazon

Firefield FF24066 night vision monocular
Firefield FF24066 NVM

  • 5×50 optics
  • lightweight
  • under 1 pound
  • 80-100 yard range

3.7 out of 5

$150

View on Amazon

now, as promised, the three professional grade models:

Pulsar Helion XP Thermal night vision monocularPulsar Helion XP Thermal NVD

  • Thermal imager
  • 11.2×32 optics
  • IPX7 Waterproof
  • 8 GB internal storage
  • heat detection up to 2000 yards

5** out of 5

$3499

View on Amazon

Flir Scout III Thermal NVDFlir Scout III Thermal NVD

  • Thermal imaging camera
  • 1200 yard heat sensing range
  • 640 x 480 pixels LCD viewing screen
  • IPX7 Waterproof

3.7** out of 5

$1449

View on Amazon

ATN OTS-HD 640 Thermal NVDATN OTS-HD 640 Thermal NVD

  • Thermal imaging camera
  • 1200 yard heat sensing range
  • 640 x 480 pixels LCD viewing screen
  • IPX7 Waterproof

3.3** out of 5

$3899

View on Amazon

** – under 25 customer reviews

BUYING GUIDE

If you want to make the buying decision for one of these monoculars that is exactly right for you, it’s important to spend some time to understand the various features and specifications available on these units, and their use in the unit operation. You can find significant variation even within the same specification on these NVMs; for instance, the viewing range may vary from a hundred yards up to a couple of thousand yards. One way to view all the different possibilities of features and specs is to rate them for your specific needs – some will be “gotta have”; no sense buying the unit if it does not have that capability. Others will be “nice to have”; they are not operation critical, but it’s probably something you would use, and it would enhance the experience using the NVM; and the last would be “bells and whistles”, features that are going to add to the cost of the monocular, but really are not needed, or even will be used, based on your equipment needs.

Final words about features and specifications. Most of what you find here, and in the next section of individual reviews, will be drawn from the Amazon web site, occasionally supplemented by information from the manufacturer or other resellers. Because of this, not all of the units will report on the same features and specifications, so further research on your part may be necessary.

Maximum range of view

Maximum range of view

This feature is exactly what the name implies – the farthest distance you can see with the device, normally expressed in yards or meters. As you might expect, the maximum range will normally be quoted under optimal conditions, like a full moon-lit night. You will see most units in the range of about one hundred yards. Note that some units will have additional illuminating capacity built into the NVM. This will increase the viewing range.

Magnification level

Magnification level

In the specifications, you will see magnification expressed like a multiplier – 2X, 5X, 8X, etc. As an example of how this works, an object 50 yards away, viewed with a 5X magnification level, would appear as if it were 10 yards away (50 yards divided by 5X = 10 yards). In the same example, a 10X magnification would make the object appear 5 yards away (50 divided by 10 = 5).

Objective lens (or objective aperture)

Objective lens (or objective aperture)

If you go back and look at the photo of the unit on the second page, the objective lens is at the front of the device. This lens collects all the light available and directs it back to the image intensifier. This lens will also provide image magnification. The larger the objective lens, the more light it will collect and capture, thereby enhancing the night vision of the object.

Optics

Optics

Optics are expressed as a combination of the magnification level (expressed as a multiplier) and the size of the objective lens, expressed in millimeters. So, an optics measure of 5×50 would indicate a magnification level of 5X, and an objective lens size of 50mm.

Screen size

Screen size

Some of these units will have a dedicated screen that can be used to play back or view recorded images. Screen sizes will typically be in the range of 2” to 4”. To supplement playback of recorded images, many of the units will have a USB port available to upload images to a computer or display on a monitor.

Screen resolution

Screen resolution

For those units with a separate screen for playback, screen resolution will define the sharpness of the recorded images. The resolution will typically be expressed in pixels, with the greater number of pixels resulting in a clearer, sharper image. Typically, you’ll see this express as 320 x 240 pixels, or 7,680 total pixels.

Day/Night use

Day/Night use

While all of these units will have night use capability, some will also be usable in normal daylight. This is normally accomplished through the use of filters, to prevent excess light from damaging the night vision components. Without these filters, the monoculars may actually be damaged and unusable.

Field of view

Field of view

Field of view, or FOV, is used to express the angle of vision attainable while looking through the NVM. Think of it in the same way as peripheral vision. A 0o FOV means you could only see objects directly in front of you; 180o FOV means you could see objects on a line parallel to you. FOV will typically be in a range of 8 – 12o with these monoculars.

Infrared illuminator

Infrared illuminator

All these devices will collect ambient light; for example, that from the moon, stars, or other lighting types. Some of these monoculars will have an infrared illuminator that will send light from the higher end of the light spectrum into the environments, to be captured and reflected back. That will increase the sharpness and clarity of the images captures, and increase the range where they can be seen.

Weight

Weight

For the most part, these units are all fairly light. However, you are still going to have to carry them around in a jacket pocket, or hanging around your neck on a lanyard, and that can get tiresome after a while. Lightweight units will check in at just under a pound.

Photo/video capability

Photo/video capability

Many of these units also act as cameras, capturing the images you see through their night vision functionality. The clarity of the photo and video images will also be expressed in pixels.

Memory storage

Memory storage

If you have a unit that has a photo and/or video capability, you will need a means to store those images, at least temporarily. Some units will have built-in storage capability, some will have the ability to store on a supplemental SD card, and some will have both capabilities. SD card sizes will typically vary from 4GB up to about 32GB.

Power source and life

Power source and life

All of these units need some type of power source to operate. The majority will run on AAA or AA alkaline batteries, some will be lithium-ion type, and some will have the recharging capability. The initial cost and subsequent replacement costs of the batteries is a factor to be considered, as it their useful life under varying operating conditions (e.g., with or without IR illuminator operating). And be aware of that dreaded phrase, “Batteries not included.”

Operating temperature range

Operating temperature range

Like just about any powered equipment, there are limitations to the temperatures where the unit is designed to be operated. In some cases, these units are not recommended in extreme heat or cold temperatures. Operating ranges should be specified for most units; if not, consult the manufacturer’s warranty.

Water resistance

Water resistance

Most likely, at one time or another, you will be using your NVM in rainy weather or inclement conditions. Water resistance in various monoculars is measured by an International Protection Code, with the ratings expressed as, for example, IPX5. The higher the number, the more water resistant the device. IPX 4 or 5 are common ratings, indicating water resistance, while an IPX 7 is rated for full submersion in up to one meter or water.

Warranty and technical support

Warranty and technical support

Hopefully, neither are needed after you’ve made your purchase, but it’s good to be prepared just in case. Manufacturer’s warranties will typically be split between the body of the NVM and the optics, such as two years on the body and five years on the optics. In many cases, longer warranties are available for purchase. Technical support can be important also, and overseas-based support will likely be more problematic than domestic representatives.

Options and special equipment and features

Options and special equipment and features

Standard equipment and features will not vary much on these units, but the capabilities of those features may vary significantly (e.g., magnification). You may also run across features on some of these units not available on others, including built-in wi-fi capability, compass, gyroscopes, range finders, and so on. Obviously, the importance of each of these will be an individual decision.

Price

Price

Last, and certainly not least, is price. In the end, pretty much all of us will have a budget for a purchase like this, and our budget may change what we want into what we can afford. The basic units here run from about $125 to almost $500; the professional units are up to almost $4000. In the end, though, it is not just the price that’s relevant. The combination of the price, the features, and the specifications that match your wants and needs most closely will determine the best value unit for you. If a unit doesn’t contribute a good value, you are probably better off waiting than buying something that will not meet your expectations.

PRODUCT REVIEWS

Boblov Digital NVM – Best Value Runner-Up

5X magnification, combined with a 32mm objective lens, combine to give a solid range length with a nice clarity of the image. Battery life is a fairly short 2.5 hours with the illuminator on, 5 hours without it. The filter is included for daytime use, built in hand/wrist strap for comfortable use.

Boblov Digital NVM

Features and specifications:

- included 16GB SD card for storage, expandable to 32GB (not included)

- illuminator allows night vision of up to 150 yards in extreme darkness

- weighs 1.4#, 8” x 5.5” x 3” size

- operates on three AA batteries (not included)

Check Price!

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Pros
  • Very strong optics with 5×32 combination
  • One of the lowest priced units on the list
  • Built-in microphone to record sound with videos
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Cons
  • Only four customer reviews to date
  • Only black and white imaging after dark, color only available in daylight photos or videos

Bestguarder HD NVM – Best Value, Best Performance Runner-Up

Superior 6×50 optics give high clarity images at up to 350 meters night time viewing. Both camera and video (with the sound capability) take high-resolution HD images. 1.5” viewing screen, day and night capable, IPX4 water resistance makes this a full use NVM.

Bestguarder HD NVM

Features and specifications:

- 1.5#, size 8” x 4” x 2.5”

- 1X – 5X digital zoom

- operating range -30oC - +50oC

- operates on four AA batteries (not included); up to 4 hours without illuminator, optional powerpack available for purchase

Check Price!

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Pros
  • Superior optics with adjustable zoom for close in or wide-angle viewing
  • Four IR levels, 3 brightness levels for clarity control
  • Supports up to 32GB SD card (not included)
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Cons
  • Very limited battery life with IR illumination on
  • Only 4oo field of view

Night Owl iGen Day/Night NVM – Best Overall

Proprietary technology is claimed to exceed third-generation technology. Enhanced infrared technology and additional light amplification (up to 650 times on ambient light) offer high-level clarity and viewing. Ten levels of IR intensity, 4 levels of brightness adjustment.

Night Owl iGen Day/Night NVM

Features and specifications:

- large unit at 1.25#, 9”x3.5”x2.5.”

- 12o FOV, day or night use, programmable time-out features

- capable of direct recording with a composite video cable (not included)

- 2.6X magnification (non-adjustable)

Check Price!

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Pros
  • The major selling point is the quality of the optics, based on the enhanced sensitivity to ambient light and the ability to generate additional IR light
  • Wide FOV at 12o
  • 85% of reviews 4 or 5 star
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Cons
  • Second highest price of the ten budget units
  • Several restrictions on sales noted
  • Battery life is not very good – only a few hours on four AA (not included)

Flir Scout TK Thermal NVM – Best Performance

This is a hand-held thermal imaging monocular, so a different technology than the night vision monoculars already reviewed. 640 x 480 pixels LCD display, small 6” x 2” x 2” size, 6 oz. weight, for portability. Five palette choices, camera, and video capability.

Flir Scout TK Thermal NVM

Features and specifications:

- two-year parts and labor warranty, ten-year optics warranty

- up to 100 yards visibility

- operates up to five hours on one rechargeable lithium battery (included)

Check Price!

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Pros
  • Strong viewing options, with the palette choices letting you customize screen colors
  • Separate focus control, eight levels of brightness control
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Cons
  • Highest priced unit, but also a different technology
  • Several restrictions on use, export, purchase
  • Complaints about tech support and service

Solomark Night Vision Monocular

Screen resolution is 320 x 240 pixels, so not as clear and crisp as some of the models. Supports SD cards from 1GB to 32GB for photo and video storage. Lightweight at only 12 ounces, it comes with a 4GB SD card, audiovisual cable, and USB cable.

Solomark Night Vision Monocular

Features and specifications:

- four positions 1X to the 3X zoom control

- 14o field of vision, 100-meter range of view

- five-hour battery life with four AA batteries (not included)

- two-year warranty

Check Price!

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Pros
  • Price. Very reasonable, and a 3.9 rating behind it
  • 75% of ratings 4 or 5 stars
  • Seven levels of IR illumination to help obtain the best possible brightness of the image
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Cons
  • No sound recording, no way to helmet or head mount
  • Several complaints related to overstated viewing range, clarity of images

Bushnell 260150 Equinox NVM

There is very limited information on this model on the Amazon site, and, somewhat surprisingly, not that much on other sites where it is offered. It has 6×50 optics, and a 6.6 to 18X digital zoom, so image quality should be fairly good. It draws a 4.2 rating on another site, similar to the 3.9 on Amazon. It has a built-in, adjustable illuminator and brightness controls, and claims a 330-yard range with full illuminator operation.

Bushnell 260150 Equinox NVM

Features and specifications:

- side rail allows additional accessories to be attached, such as a second illuminator

- IPX4 water resistance rating

- 20o FOV at 100 yards

Check Price!

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Pros
  • Coated optics to reduce glare and increase light transmission
  • Day and night operation; color screen during one-day operation
  • Capable of being rifle mounted (verify legality in your state/locality)
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Cons
  • Complaints about very short battery life, and overall image quality despite the optics
  • A bit clunky at 9” x 5” x3”, close to 2#

Sightmark Ghost Hunter NVM

2×24 optics, with a built-in IR illuminator that lends itself to close in viewing. Lightweight and compact at 4” x3” x 9”, 8.8 ounces; polymer construction. Limited information on the Amazon site more available on the manufacturer’s site. Three-year warranty on the tube, limited lifetime on the housing.

Sightmark Ghost Hunter NVM

Features and specifications:

- runs on two AA batteries, with the life of 72 hours without IR and 20 hours with IR

- 2X magnification, no zoom

- no photo or recording capability

- listed at the 80-yard range

Check Price!

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Pros
  • Price is at the lower end of the scale for this list
  • Weight and size make for good ergonomics
  • Battery life is good
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Cons
  • Very limited features compared to other models
  • 17% of reviews were one- or two-star, and most of those extremely negative

Double Sun HD NVM

Optics are 5×40, with a 1.5” LCD screen. Supports day and night use, video and photos, 8GB SD card included. Weighs in at 1.5#, 9” x 5.5” x 3”. Comes with a rechargeable, replaceable battery. Claims up to 200-meter range in full dark viewing. Limited number of customer reviews.

Double Sun HD NVM

Features and specifications:

- comfortable design with hand/wrist strap for good ergonomics

- up to 8X digital zoom, 5X optical zoom, 40mm objective lens

- comes with USB and video cords for transferring data to computers or monitors for viewing

- manual brightness and sharpness adjustment, 400 x 200 pixels clarity

Check Price!

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Pros
  • Under $200 price for a reasonable list of features
  • Has rail available to mount extra IR illuminator if desired
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Cons
  • Very short battery life with IR. Claimed under one hour by reviewers, manufacturer lists as 1.5 hours
  • Only 5o field of view

Firefield FF24063 NVM

Another model with very limited information available on Amazon. The device has 4×50 optical and is rated water resistant. Operates on two AAA batteries, included, and comes with a three-year warranty. It has a rated 130-yard range of detection. Lowest priced NVM on the list but limited functions – no camera or video.

Firefield FF24063 NVM

Features and specifications:

- built-in IR illuminator

- 4x magnification

- fairly wide 15oFOV

- rubberized body and eye piece for increased water resistance


Check Price!

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Pros
  • Reviewers claim battery life is decent
  • Meets expectations if you are looking for a short-range device at a reasonable price point
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Cons
  • Picture is claimed to be grainy
  • Difficult to focus

Firefield FF24066 NVM

Much like the prior model, not very much information available on the Amazon site. This model has 5×50 optics, 5X magnification, and is geared to provide a better-quality image and resolution. With built-in IR, a rubberized housing, and an ergonomic design, it’s well suited for field use in various operations and hobbies.

Firefield FF24066 NVM

Features and specifications:

- 15o field of view

- operates on two AA batteries, with a temperature range of -20oC - +40oC

- size is 9”x 5” x 3”, with weight just under one pound

Check Price!

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Pros
  • Price is only slightly higher than the FF24063 model, but better optics with this model
  • Battery performance is also rated as fairly good with this model
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Cons
  • Image quality is not rated well, and the unit is difficult to focus and adjust
  • Range of vision not rated well by users; short with poor quality imagery

PROFESSIONAL LEVEL NIGHT VISION MONOCULARS

Pulsar Helion XP Thermal – Best Professional RunnerUp

This is a thermal monocular, as opposed to most of the other models, which are night vision through light amplification. As we noted earlier, thermal devices will use differentiated temperature to highlight images. With a $3500 price tag, this is definitely a professional grade. This model can detect a man-sized image at up to 1100 yards – almost 5/8 of a mile.

Pulsar Helion XP Thermal

Features and specifications:

- video recorder with 8GB internal data storage, with built-in wi-fi

- IPX 7 waterproof, submersible to 1 meter

- eight-hour rechargeable battery pack

- 640 x 480 pixels for clear display, supplemented by seven palette choices

Check Price!

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Pros
  • Three-year warranty on the unit, ten-years on the sensors
  • Pretty much everything you could ask for or expect in a thermal sensor
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Cons
  • Price is pretty scary to the average Joe
  • Only seven reviews on this model

Flir Scout III Thermal – Best Professional

This is another professional grade, thermal unit. At 12 ounces, it’s easily portable, and it can detect heat signatures at up to 1200 yards. A 640 x 480 pixels LCD screen gives bright and clear image differentiation, supported by a wide choice of color palettes. A 5-hour battery life, the 24o field of view, and a wide operating temperature range make this unit a good choice for military, rescue, and police operations.

Flir Scout III Thermal

Features and specifications:

- sized at 9” x 10” x 3.7”, and only 12 ounces, this is a good, portable unit for in the field operations

- a rechargeable battery system lasts up to five hours of use

- delivered with all cables, charging systems, batteries, etc. Easy transfer of stored images

Check Price!

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Pros
  • $2000 less than other similar thermal detectors, with similar features
  • All the basics and enough bells and whistles to keep even the most tech-savvy user happy
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Cons
  • Limited reviews, which show a bit of a love-hate relationship. 70% five stars, 20% three stars, 10% one and two stars
  • Price is significantly lower than the other two professional models but still represents some serious money. Still not a good fit for the casual user

ATN OTS-HD640 Thermal

At least based on price, this is the big brother of the three professional-grade models. It’s also the big brother in features and options, including rangefinders, wi-fi, compass, gyroscope and much more. It has magnification from 2.5X to 25X, with 640 x 480 pixels HD resolution. It’s wi-fi compatible with both iOS and Android phones for instant image streaming.

ATN OTS-HD640 Thermal

Features and specifications:

- works in both day and night modes

- highly accurate range finder is a good feature for hunters

- e-zoom functionality reduces jerky transition of images as you move from far to near and reverse

- instant recording to SD cards, or streaming to compatible devices for storage and viewing

Check Price!

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Pros
  • The device has pretty much anything you could want in a thermal unit. All the basic functionality, plus any option you can think of
  • There is actually a $1000 higher priced model in the same family, which makes this look like a bargain
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Cons
  • $3900. Do I need to say more?
  • Only four reviews on this product


CONCLUSION

We hope this review of best night vision monoculars will help you make a faster, informed decision if you are planning a purchase of a monocular any time soon. With such a wide range of specifications and features, and so many different applications to fit them into, it may be a difficult decision, but we’re sure one of the products here will meet your requirements and expectations.

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